Meet The Jewish Artist Who Was The First Woman To Draw ‘Wonder Woman’

Posted on June 25th, 2017
By Jenny Singer for The Forward
 

Maybe one day they will say that behind every “great woman” there has to be countless stories of other great women who supported them. And behind the icon of great womanhood “Wonder Woman” is the legendary cartoonist Trina Robbins.

Robbins, 78, has made a career of shading in the colorful histories of unsung female heroes. She was approached to illustrate the limited series “The Legend of Wonder Woman” in 1986.

She says she imagined producers at DC reasoned: “Why don’t we just give it to Trina — we all know she loves “Wonder Woman”. Even if she screws it up, it’s just four issues.”

Read more: 

These Dads Are Expecting a Baby After Miscarriage–Here’s Their Story

Posted on June 18th, 2017
BY JOANNA C. VALENTE for Kveller


All families come in different shapes and sizes and kinds–but that doesn’t mean the love is any less. For one married couple who are dads to two kids, this couldn’t be more true–and a lesson for those who think families do come “one way.” Trystan and Biff are two dads living in Portland, Oregon who adopted their two children. However, their family isn’t stopping there: Trystan is pregnant.

Trystan is transgender–and has been pregnant before, but suffered a miscarriage around six weeks. For any parent, this is devastating but for Trystan, it was especially complicated because trying to become pregnant means he couldn’t take testosterone. This was why the couple decided to try again shortly after the miscarriage–which the couple discussed on the WNYC podcast, the Longest Shortest Time.

Continue reading.

How Rabbis Are Trying To Make The Conservative Movement More Gay-Friendly

Posted on June 11th, 2017
Daniel J. Solomon for The Forward


The Jewish coming-of-age ceremony known as a bar mitzvah is always challenging. It happens at the awkward age of the early teen years, and requires the child to chant, before family, friends and congregation, from the archaic Hebrew of the Torah.

For Amichai Lau-Lavie, the Israeli-born scion of an Eastern European rabbinical dynasty, it was even more difficult. The section he read, called Kedoshim, contained the biblical prohibition against sex between two men:


“A man who lies with a male as one would with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination; they shall surely be put to death; their blood is upon themselves.”

It was a painful moment for Lau-Lavie, now 48, who had already realized he was gay.

Read more: 

No, Hillel Is Not Anti-LGBT: The OSU Controversy Explained

Posted on June 4th, 2017
By Kyle Gersman for The Forward
 

This week, Ohio State University Hillel was accused of being anti-LGBT because it was forced to disassociate with a Jewish LGBT campus group, B’nai Keshet, after the group decided to co-sponsor a fundraiser for queer refugees with Jewish Voice for Peace. I was shocked to hear this accusation and wanted to understand where it had come from, and why.

Being gay and Jewish, I’m fortunate to have a supportive community in my life at Ohio State University, which has allowed me to be active throughout campus as a University Ambassador, a brother of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity, and a Morrill Scholar for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, to name a few. My engagement with OSU Hillel has absolutely made me feel more comfortable as a Jewish college student, especially amidst rising anti-Semitic incidents across the country, and I have found an inclusive, welcoming community for LGBT Jews. But recently, this support has been under attack.

Continue reading.

Jewish dating site—to match gay men with lesbians

Posted on May 28th, 2017
Kobi Nachshoni for YNETNews


A new Israeli site is meant for gay and lesbian religious Jews who want to have a 'traditional' Jewish household with somebody of the opposite sex


A new dating site for gay and lesbian Orthodox Jews seeks to enable them to meet, have children, and raise them together in a "traditional" setting. Thus far, nearly 50 users have signed up, hoping to enter into a halachic Jewish marriage with a person of the opposite sex, despite their sexual orientation to the contrary.

Continue reading.

Pages