Sukkot and Simchat Torah: the Basics

Posted on September 16th, 2018
This article has been reprinted with permission from InterfaithFamily.com 


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Sukkot is the third and final festival that commemorates the Jewish exodus from Egypt. The escape of Israel from Egypt is remembered at Passover, entering into a covenant with God at Mount Sinai is recalled at Shavuot, and sleeping in a temporary hut or booth (“sukkah” in Hebrew) while wandering in the wilderness is memorialized in the holiday of Sukkot. “Sukkot” is the plural form of sukkah.

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For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit Jvillage Network's Sukkot & Simchat Torah Guide. 
 

A comprehensive guide to the High Holy Days from InterfaithFamily.com

Posted on September 9th, 2018
This article has been reprinted with permission from InterfaithFamily 


 

Among the items you'll find in the Guide:

  • What is the Meaning of the High Holy Days?
  • The Days In Between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur & Being Together in Community
  • Symbols and Rituals
  • Fasting on Yom Kippur
  • The Shofar
  • Wearing White and Not Wearing Leather
  • How to Greet People during the High Holy Days
  • Tashlich: A Fun Accessible Ceremony
  • High Holy Days Food!
  • Celebrating High Holy Days with Kids & Family
  • Public Schools and the High Holy Days
  • Fun and Meaningful Activities; Great Storybooks for Young Kids
  • Planning Ahead
  •  

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Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur

Posted on September 2nd, 2018
This article has been reprinted with permission from InterfaithFamily 


Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, and Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, are also known as the High Holy Days or the Days of Awe (Also referred to as the High Holidays). These holidays usually fall in September or October and are often characterized by long synagogue services and a focus on repentance.


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For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas about the High Holidays, visit Jvillage Network's High Holiday Guide.

 

Liberal Rabbis Increasingly Support Officiating Weddings With Non-Jewish Clergy

Posted on August 26th, 2018
Ari Feldman for The Forward


Rabbi Lev Baesh has co-officiated a wedding with a Native American chief on the shores of Lake Michigan. He conducted Paris’ first Catholic-Jewish ceremony. One time, he stood under the chuppah with a Hindu pundit; another, with a Shiite cleric. Things finally got tricky with an evangelical preacher — who’d been asked by the Jewish groom not to mention Jesus.


“During the wedding, when he was emoting and speaking off the cuff, it just came out,” Baesh remembered. “I watched [the groom’s] mother gasp for air.”


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I Found Religion, My Spouse Left It, What About Our Kids?

Posted on August 19th, 2018
By Dawn Kepler for BuildingJewishBridges


Dear Dawn: I’m the daughter of a Jewish father and non-Jewish mother who raised me with no religion. Finding my way into Judaism has been difficult and, at times, painful. My partner, Tom, was raised Christian and is now an atheist. While he has warm feelings for his church, he no longer belongs. When discussing how we would raise children, I mentioned enrolling them in Sunday school and their having b’nai mitzvah. To my surprise, he was resistant to this idea. It turns out the experience of being raised in a religion and subsequently separating himself from it was a lot more of a struggle than I realized. 

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